Gastroscopy, Gastroenterology, Private Gastroscopy clinic London

Private gastroenterology Clinic London, Gastroenterology Consultants

Private Gastroenterologist based at leading London Clinic in Clapham

Specialists in Digestive Health

Gastroenterology The Centre for Medical and Surgical Gastroenterology at the SW11 Medical provides clinical expertise in all aspects of gastroenterology, including upper and lower gastrointestinal disease and pancreatic disorders. A number of our consultants specialise in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and microscopic colitis, and functional gastrointestinal disorders.
Consultant Gastroenterologist, Endoscopist Mark Stobinski MD PhD

GASTROENTEROLOGY / ENDOSCOPY
Consultation£95
Consultation + gastroscopy£365
Consultation + colonoscopy£365
Follow–up consultation£80
Histopathology test£70

A gastroscopy is often referred to as an endoscopy

Endoscopy is an umbrella term that describes all types of investigations that are done in the digestive system using an endoscope

A long, thin, tube with a minute video camera at one end which can relay images or video taken inside the body.


Gastroscopy, Gastroenterology, Private Gastroscopy London

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) also called “gastrointestinal tract down to the duodenum.” Gastroenterology, All Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, including Colonoscopy, ERCP, Gastroscopy, Capsule Endoscopy and Balloon Enteroscopy, Dyspepsia (indigestion) and Reflux Disease, Pancreas and Biliary Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBS), Endoscopic management/Stenting of Gastrointestinal Cancers
Private Gastroenterologist London Cost

Treatments for acid reflux

Acid reflux treatment really contains three essential elements. These are:

  • Diet  – Drugs –  Surgery

Some people are able to manage their heartburn or other reflux symptoms by dietary changes alone. Although many people do not realise it, most episodes of reflux occur in the two hours after eating. The more you eat, the more likely you are to suffer. What is more, if you lie down soon after eating, the acid which has gone up into your oesophagus is less likely to clear because gravity is not working for you!


Q: GASTROENTEROLOGY DESCRIPTION
The medical specialty devoted to the study, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the digestive system. These disorders may affect the esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum, liver, gallbladder, or pancreas.

Q: Medical Definition of Endoscopy
Endoscopy: Examination of the inside of the body by using a lighted, flexible instrument called an endoscope. … Although endoscopy can include examination of other organs, the most common endoscopic procedures evaluate the esophagus, stomach, and portions of the intestine.

Q: What is a Gastroscopy?

During a Gastroscopy your endoscopes passes a long flexible tube containing a camera and a light through your mouth, over the back of your tongue, down your oesophagus (gullet), into your stomach and the first part of the small bowel (duodenum). This allows your endoscopes to view the lining of these organs.


Q: Why would I need this procedure?

A Gastroscopy will help your doctor to find out why you are having symptoms and make a diagnosis. If it is related to your upper GI tract it will give your endoscopist a clear view of the lining of upper digestive tract and allows your endoscopist to take tissue samples (biopsies) if necessary.


Q: What should I do before I come to TMC
For the gastroscopy to be successful your stomach needs to be empty. It is important that you do not have anything to eat for at least four hours before your procedure and only drink water until two hours before your appointment time. You may take your usual medication with a small amount of water or bring it with you and take it after the test if required. If you are diabetic, your consultant will discuss your diabetic management with you prior to your test. If you have any concerns, please contact our diabetic liaison nurse in our Endoscopy Unit. If you are taking stomach medication you may be advised to stop taking these two weeks before your appointment. This will make it easier for the doctor to see if there are any problems. However, if you have recently had a gastroscopy and were given stomach medication as a result, you must not stop your stomach medication when you come for your repeat test, as the doctor will want to see if the medication is helping you. Opening hours: Monday to Saturday – 9.00am to 9.00pm. If you take any blood thinning medication (except aspirin) such as warfarin or clopidogrel please contact the reception for further advice as you may have to stop these drugs.

Q: Will I need conscious sedation?
Should you choose conscious sedation injection you must be aware it is not like having a general anaesthetic? It will make you feel relaxed and drowsy, you will be able to hear and understand what is being said to you. The sedative is given through a cannula that will be inserted in your arm. Alternatively, you will be given the choice of a local anaesthetic throat spray, which numbs the back of your throat making the procedure more comfortable.

Q: What do I need to bring with me?
Please wear loose comfortable clothing and bring the following with you:

  • A list of all your medications and allergies any allergies you may have.
  • If having conscious sedation, bring the name and telephone number of the person who will be collecting you. A responsible adult will need to stay with you for 12 hours following the conscious sedation.
  • Reading glasses

Do not bring any valuables with you, as the trust cannot take responsibility for any losses.


Q: What will happen when I arrive on the Endoscopy unit prior to my procedure?

A trained nurse will review your medical history, medications and any allergies. Your blood pressure, pulse and oxygen saturations will be taken. The nurse will explain the procedure, discuss your preference for conscious sedation or a local anaesthetic throat spray and will give you the opportunity to ask questions.

If you choose the conscious sedation you will have a small plastic tube (cannula) inserted into a vein in your arm so the medication can be administered. The risks of the procedure will be discussed and if you wish to proceed you will then be asked to sign a consent form. This is to confirm that you understand the procedure and want to go ahead with it. You will then be taken to a pre procedure waiting room where you will wait until you are collected and taken to the procedure room for your gastroscopy.


Q: What are the potential risks and side effects?
Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is an extremely safe procedure; the chances of any complications are minimal. Risks include:

  • Perforation – approximately 1 in every 10,000 procedures.
  • It is possible to damage the linning of upper gastrointestinal tract. An operation may required to mend the tear.
  • Bleeding – approximately 1:1000 for diagnostic procedures.
  • Missed pathology – this is possible if a procedure is incomplete.
  • Adverse effects of medications – this can usually be reversed with medication.

A trained nurse will review your medical history, medications and any allergies. Your blood pressure, pulse and oxygen saturations will be taken. The nurse will explain the procedure, discuss your preference for conscious sedation or a local anaesthetic throat spray and will give you the opportunity to ask questions.

If you choose the conscious sedation you will have a small plastic tube (cannula) inserted into a vein in your arm so the medication can be administered. The risks of the procedure will be discussed and if you wish to proceed you will then be asked to sign a consent form. This is to confirm that you understand the procedure and want to go ahead with it. You will then be taken to a pre procedure waiting room where you will wait until you are collected and taken to the procedure room for your gastroscopy.


Q: What happens during the gastroscopy?
A gastroscopy takes approximately 10 minutes. Any dentures will need to be removed before the procedure begins. You will be asked to lie on your left side. You will be given oxygen a nasally a small sponge sits in your nostril. The nurses will monitor you closely during the procedure and will observe your pulse and oxygen saturations. Before the gastroscopy starts you will be given the local anaesthetic throat spray and/or conscious sedation injection depending on your choice. A mouth guard is placed in your mouth prior to passing the gastroscope. Your endoscopist will ask you to swallow to allow the gastroscope to pass into your oesophagus and down towards your stomach.   You may cough at this point any saliva in your mouth will be suctioned away by a nurse. In order to see the lining of the stomach and duodenum, air will be gently blown through the gastroscope. This can sometimes feel a little uncomfortable giving you a bloated feeling.

Q: What happens after the procedure?
After a gastroscopy with conscious sedation you will be taken to the recovery area for a minimum of 30 minutes to one hour until you are fully awake. The nurse will monitor your pulse regularly. If you have the local anaesthetic throat spray you will be in recovery for approximately 10 minutes for the nurse to record your blood pressure and discharge you. Please note that if the endoscopist has taken oesophageal biopsies you will have to stay in recovery for 30 minutes to ensure you are not bleeding. The back of your throat may feel sore for the rest of the day and you may feel a little bloated. If you had the sedation you may feel tired. When you are ready to go home the nurse or endoscopist will discuss the results of your gastroscopy with you in a private room. If you wish to have a family member/friend present please inform the nurse. After your Gastroscopy if you develop any of the following symptoms you need to consult a doctor immediately:

  • Vomiting blood
  • Fever
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Chest pains
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Abdominal distension
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Bowel motions turn black

Q: What can I expect following conscious sedation?
The effects of sedation can last up to 24 hours.

  • You will need a responsible adult (aged 18+) to collect you from the Endoscopy Unit and stay with you for at least 12 hours after your test.
  • You must not drive a car/motorbike, operate machinery (including using your cooker), drink alcohol.
  • You should not look after any young children alone.
  • You should not take sleeping tablets.
  • You should not sign a legal document within 24 hours of having a sedative.
  • We advise you to go home and rest.
  • You can eat a light diet, drink as normal.
  • You can take your usual medication.
  • If you have had sedation then you should be able to return to work after 24 hours.

Q: What can I expect following local anaesthetic throat spray?
You do not need an escort to take you home. You are able to drive a car/motorbike after your procedure. We advise you to go home and rest. You can eat and drink normally one hour after the spray has been given and take your usual medication. If you have had a local anaesthetic throat spray you can resume your normal activities as soon as you feel able to.

Q: Consent
Although you consent for this treatment, you may at any time after that withdraw such consent. Please discuss this with your medical team.

Q: Important information

The information in this leaflet is for guidance purposes only and is not provided to replace professional clinical advice from a qualified practitioner.


Q: Your comments

We are always interested to hear your views about our leaflets. If you have any comments, please contact the Manager , Agnieszka Kazimierczak:


Q: Hand hygiene
The Trust is committed to maintaining a clean, safe environment. Hand hygiene is very important in controlling infection. Alcohol gel is widely available at the patient bedside for staff use and at the entrance of each clinical area for visitors to clean their hands before and after entering. After reading this information are there any questions you would like to ask? Please list below and ask your nurse or doctor.

Q: Reference
The following have been consulted and agreed this patient information: Consultant Gastroenterologists